Highlights from Kindle reading over the past few months, stripped of context and (unfortunately in the Instapaper articles) titles and authors. I’ll need to find a better approach eventually.

Instapaper: Wednesday, Sep. 29th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 816-820 | Added on Friday, 1 October 2021 22:31:48

Yes, according to this statement, everything is chaos and disorder—the terrible heat inside stars, the walls of fire of galactic nebulae set alight by mutual penetration, the gas balls of suns; after all—say those sober, rational, and thus undoubtedly correct people—no device, no kind of organization, not even the smallest trace of it can appear in oceans of boiling fire; suns are blind volcanoes that spit out planets, while planets, exceptionally and rarely, sometimes create man—everything else is the lifeless fury of degenerate atomic gases, a swarm of apocalyptic fires shaking their prominences.

Instapaper: Wednesday, Sep. 29th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 842-850 | Added on Friday, 1 October 2021 22:36:58

You’re wrong. For you think the Earth is a crumb of life within an ocean of nothingness. You think man is solitary, and has the stars, the nebulae, the galaxies as adversaries, as enemies. You think the only knowledge that can be obtained is the kind he has possessed and will continue to possess—man, the only creator of Order, endlessly threatened by a deluge of infinity that radiates distant points of light. But that is not the case. The hierarchy of active endurance is omnipresent. Anyone who so wishes may call it life. On its peaks, at the heights of energy arousal, fiery organisms endure. Just before the limit, at the point of absolute zero, in the land of darkness and of the final, hardening breath, life appears once more, as a weak reflection of that one, as its pale, dying memory—that is us. So look, and learn humility as well as hope, because one day the Sun will become a nova, and will embrace us with the merciful arm of a conflagration, and thus, returning into the eternal whirligig of life, becoming particles of its greatness, we shall achieve more profound knowledge than may fall to the lot of the inhabitants of a glacial zone.

Instapaper: Wednesday, Oct. 6th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 987-989 | Added on Wednesday, 6 October 2021 22:08:05

Orwell’s projections come from the era of information broadcasting, and are not applicable to our own. Had Orwell been able to equip Big Brother with all the tools of artificial intelligence, he would still have been writing from an older paradigm, and the result could never have described our situation today, nor suggested where we might be heading.

Instapaper: Wednesday, Oct. 6th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 998-1001 | Added on Wednesday, 6 October 2021 22:08:39

A world of informational transparency will necessarily be one of deliriously multiple viewpoints, shot through with misinformation, disinformation, conspiracy theories and a quotidian degree of madness. We may be able to see what’s going on more quickly, but that doesn’t mean we’ll agree about it any more readily.

Instapaper: Wednesday, Oct. 6th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 1006-1007 | Added on Wednesday, 6 October 2021 22:09:00

If you wish to know an era, study its most lucid nightmares. In the mirrors of our darkest fears, much will be revealed. But don’t mistake those mirrors for road maps to the future, or even to the present.

Instapaper: Monday, Oct. 11th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 300-301 | Added on Thursday, 14 October 2021 22:50:05

“Living systems,” wrote biological theorist Stuart Kauffman, “exist in the solid regime near the edge of chaos, and natural selection achieves and sustains such a poised state.”

Instapaper: Wednesday, Oct. 27th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 713-721 | Added on Tuesday, 26 October 2021 21:27:03

The latter was asked “why he believed in Islam when he claimed that religious groups were all equal in their ability to defend their positions.” Abu Sulaiman replied, in part: I am in the situation of a man who has entered the courtyard of a caravansary by day to seek a moment’s shade, at a time when the sky was cloudless. The keeper of the caravansary brought him to an apartment without asking about his condition or health. In this situation he suddenly found that a cloud had blown up and released a downpour. The apartment leaked, so the occupant looked at the other apartments in the inn, and saw that they too were leaking. He saw mud in the courtyard of the building, and considered staying where he was and not moving to another apartment; [for, by remaining,] he could enjoy his ease and avoid getting his legs splattered by the thick mud and slime of the courtyard. [So] he was inclined to wait patiently in his apartment and stay in the situation in which he found himself. (excerpted in Roy Mottahedeh, Loyalty and Leadership in an Early Islamic Society, 30–31 [Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980])

Instapaper: Monday, Oct. 25th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 756-760 | Added on Tuesday, 26 October 2021 22:50:56

In Divine Flashes, ‘Iraqi defines love as the unknowable essence of God, the origin of everything. Nothing in the Universe truly exists, he says, except love – it is the ultimate ‘being’ that underpins all reality: Love flows in everything, so necessarily it is all things … There is nothing in existence except it. And if not for it, that which was manifested into existence would not have manifested. That which has manifested was manifested from love and love flows in it – it is all love.

Opinion | Elon Musk Is Building a Sci-Fi World, and the Rest of Us Are Trapped in It (nytimes.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 81-83 | Added on Thursday, 4 November 2021 19:58:57

How have these men so gravely misread these books? One clue lies in the science fiction they seem, mostly, to ignore: new wave, Afrofuturism, feminist and post-colonial science fiction, the work of writers like Margaret Atwood, Vandana Singh, Octavia Butler and Ted Chiang.

Instapaper: Monday, Jul. 26th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 199-201 | Added on Sunday, 7 November 2021 22:23:33

By recognizing, at last, the ubiquity of sharing and chaperoning, by acknowledging the fact that communal traits are quite natural, we get to see ourselves anew. We can return to our role as nurturers, each a helper among helpers in this planetary story of collaborative healing.

Instapaper: Monday, Jul. 26th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 237-238 | Added on Sunday, 7 November 2021 22:26:57

The more our media interfaces act as intermediaries between ourselves and our world, the harder it gets to distinguish between what is important and unimportant in a situation.

Instapaper: Monday, Jul. 26th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 276-279 | Added on Sunday, 7 November 2021 22:32:11

Art is neither a system for transmitting information nor a mode of self-expression. It does these things no better than any number of activities. Art is the seizure of a vision that exceeds language. It captures a slice of the Real and preserves it in an artifact. The work of art is fractal and open—an inexhaustible well of meaning and image overflowing the limits of the communicable.

Meditations On Moloch (slatestarcodex.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 170-174 | Added on Monday, 8 November 2021 20:47:14

A basic principle unites all of the multipolar traps above. In some competition optimizing for X, the opportunity arises to throw some other value under the bus for improved X. Those who take it prosper. Those who don’t take it die out. Eventually, everyone’s relative status is about the same as before, but everyone’s absolute status is worse than before. The process continues until all other values that can be traded off have been – in other words, until human ingenuity cannot possibly figure out a way to make things any worse.

Meditations On Moloch (slatestarcodex.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 189-191 | Added on Monday, 8 November 2021 20:50:33

Any human with above room temperature IQ can design a utopia. The reason our current system isn’t a utopia is that it wasn’t designed by humans. Just as you can look at an arid terrain and determine what shape a river will one day take by assuming water will obey gravity, so you can look at a civilization and determine what shape its institutions will one day take by assuming people will obey incentives.

Meditations On Moloch (slatestarcodex.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 292-295 | Added on Monday, 8 November 2021 21:05:35

Turning “satisfying customers” and “satisfying citizens” into the outputs of optimization processes was one of civilization’s greatest advances and the reason why capitalist democracies have so outperformed other systems. But if we have bound Moloch as our servant, the bonds are not very strong, and we sometimes find that the tasks he has done for us move to his advantage rather than ours.

Meditations On Moloch (slatestarcodex.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 486-487 | Added on Monday, 8 November 2021 21:33:38

“The wages of sin is Death.” Gotcha! The wages of everything is Death! This is a Communist universe, the amount you work makes no difference to your eventual reward. From each according to his ability, to each Death.

Meditations On Moloch (slatestarcodex.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 606-606 | Added on Monday, 8 November 2021 22:19:55

I am a transhumanist because I do not have enough hubris not to try to kill God.

The Great Unflattening (medium.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 16-18 | Added on Friday, 19 November 2021 22:47:39

We’re asking for boldness, collaboration, courage, creativity and imagination, but we don’t acknowledge that those are not things that can suddenly occur — they take space, cultivation and practice — and communities that can tend to those things.

Instapaper: Monday, Nov. 22nd (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 598-599 | Added on Saturday, 27 November 2021 09:43:28

Hyperobjects speak to the immense, structural forces all around us, and even inside us, that we cannot see with our eyes but strive to comprehend through data or computer modeling.

Instapaper: Monday, Nov. 22nd (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 609-609 | Added on Saturday, 27 November 2021 09:44:35

concrete will soon outweigh all living matter on the planet.

Humankind (Morton, Timothy)

  • Your Highlight at location 59-62 | Added on Saturday, 27 November 2021 10:42:48

Man issued from the womb of Mother Earth, but he knew it not, nor recognized her, to whom he owed his life. In his egotism he sought an explanation of himself in the infinite, and out of his efforts there arose the dreary doctrine that he was not related to the Earth, that she was but a temporary resting place for his scornful feet and that she held nothing for him but temptation to degrade himself.

Instapaper: Monday, Nov. 22nd (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 711-713 | Added on Saturday, 27 November 2021 11:05:41

Depending on your perspective, almost anything can be a hyperobject, can be inside one, or both. That doesn’t make the concept meaningless, though; it means that the deep reality of your everyday world is quietly full to bursting with the uncanny, both familiar and alien in equal measure.

Instapaper: Monday, Nov. 22nd (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 852-854 | Added on Saturday, 27 November 2021 11:12:34

it should make us wonder why we in the West have treated the chaotic flow of the river we can’t step into twice as mere appearance, beneath which are the real and eternal principles of order that explain that flow. Why our ontological preference for the eternally unchanging over the eternally swirling water and dust?

Instapaper: Monday, Nov. 22nd (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 861-863 | Added on Saturday, 27 November 2021 11:13:42

Indeed, complete certainty of results from a machine learning model is a cause for scepticism about that model. Machine learning’s outputs, as probabilistic, have some degree of inaccuracy built into them; a true probabilistic statement is one that correctly predicts how often it will be wrong.

Welcoming the stranger as an act of delight | The Sprawl (sprawlcalgary.com)

If you structure your life solely in a fraternal way, it really makes it very difficult for the new to present itself.

Welcoming the stranger as an act of delight | The Sprawl (sprawlcalgary.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 84-85 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 19:31:46

The danger of likeness is the danger of always being enchanted by the mirror you see, enchanted by yourself.

Welcoming the stranger as an act of delight | The Sprawl (sprawlcalgary.com)

  • Your Highlight at location 106-109 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 19:35:19

Both of them see human beings as homo miserabilis. That is, they see human beings as needy, and they see the market as satisfying that need or they see the state as satisfying that need. That is to really mean that all human beings in the end, given this way of understanding what it means to be human, are consumers. What goes in their mouth, what they evacuate, speeding up that process is the goal of life. Well, that is just an awful way of thinking of human beings.

Instapaper: Tuesday, Nov. 30th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 115-117 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 19:45:36

worry friendship is the next territory of consumption and commodification, to the point where you can no longer simply wander with a friend, just to see what closeness might occur. When we have been alone in so many ways for so long, I worry that we run the risk of losing the ability to find value in one another organically, in the ways people know best.

Instapaper: Tuesday, Nov. 30th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 133-135 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 19:47:57

the thing, sadly, about production and consumption is that our culture has fashioned it so that we can engage in such acts alone, even when we are in a room full of people. We browse alone. We buy alone. We are so close to living and dying alone.

Instapaper: Tuesday, Nov. 30th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 152-153 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 19:49:54

The beauty of people is that you become beholden to the fragility and waywardness of others, just as they are beholden to you.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 15 | location 223-224 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 21:15:37

term ‘inequality’ is a way of framing social problems appropriate to an age of technocratic reformers, who assume from the outset that no real vision of social transformation is even on the table.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 17 | location 259-260 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 21:19:30

What if we treat people, from the beginning, as imaginative, intelligent, playful creatures who deserve to be understood as such?

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 32 | location 484-486 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 21:50:03

‘Security’ takes many forms. There is the security of knowing one has a statistically smaller chance of getting shot with an arrow. And then there’s the security of knowing that there are people in the world who will care deeply if one is.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 37 | location 559-560 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 21:58:15

the course of human history may be less set in stone, and more full of playful possibilities, than we tend to assume.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 44 | location 663-665 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 22:09:24

the whole story we summarized in the last chapter – our standard historical meta-narrative about the ambivalent progress of human civilization, where freedoms are lost as societies grow bigger and more complex – was invented largely for the purpose of neutralizing the threat of indigenous critique.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 50 | location 766-767 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 22:19:29

We will suggest that there is a reason why so many key Enlightenment thinkers insisted that their ideals of individual liberty and political equality were inspired by Native American sources and examples. Because it was true.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 55 | location 830-832 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 22:28:39

When it came to questions of personal freedom, the equality of men and women, sexual mores or popular sovereignty – or even, for that matter, theories of depth psychology18 – indigenous American attitudes are likely to be far closer to the reader’s own than seventeenth-century European ones.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 71 | location 1081-1085 | Added on Tuesday, 30 November 2021 23:19:50

Kandiaronk: I have spent six years reflecting on the state of European society and I still can’t think of a single way they act that’s not inhuman, and I genuinely think this can only be the case, as long as you stick to your distinctions of ‘mine’ and ‘thine’. I affirm that what you call money is the devil of devils; the tyrant of the French, the source of all evils; the bane of souls and slaughterhouse of the living. To imagine one can live in the country of money and preserve one’s soul is like imagining one could preserve one’s life at the bottom of a lake.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 107 | location 1634-1637 | Added on Wednesday, 1 December 2021 22:07:49

Carefully working through ethnographic accounts of existing egalitarian foraging bands in Africa, South America and Southeast Asia, Boehm identifies a whole panoply of tactics collectively employed to bring would-be braggarts and bullies down to earth – ridicule, shame, shunning (and in the case of inveterate sociopaths, sometimes even outright assassination)19 – none of which have any parallel among other primates.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 117 | location 1779-1783 | Added on Wednesday, 1 December 2021 22:26:14

In this sense, the Western philosophical tradition has taken a rather unusual direction over the last few centuries. Around the same time as it abandoned dialogue as its typical mode of writing, it also began imagining the isolated, rational, self-conscious individual not as a rare achievement, something typically accomplished – if at all – after literally years of living isolated in a cave or monastic cell, or on top of a pillar in a desert somewhere, but as the normal default state of human beings anywhere.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 133 | location 2028-2029 | Added on Thursday, 2 December 2021 21:44:23

In this case, people actually adopted different names in summer and winter – literally becoming someone else, depending on the time of year.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 143 | location 2187-2189 | Added on Thursday, 2 December 2021 21:59:12

What’s really important about such festivals is that they kept the old spark of political self-consciousness alive. They allowed people to imagine that other arrangements are feasible, even for society as a whole, since it was always possible to fantasize about carnival bursting its seams and becoming the new reality.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 159 | location 2425-2429 | Added on Friday, 3 December 2021 21:39:57

put the matter more technically: what the Hadza, Wendat or ‘egalitarian’ people such as the Nuer seem to have been concerned with were not so much formal freedoms as substantive ones.12 They were less interested in the right to travel than in the possibility of actually doing so (hence, the matter was typically framed as an obligation to provide hospitality to strangers). Mutual aid – what contemporary European observers often referred to as ‘communism’ – was seen as the necessary condition for individual autonomy.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 167 | location 2551-2554 | Added on Friday, 3 December 2021 21:52:16

foragers (who after all tended to be intimately familiar with all aspects of the growing cycles of food plants) were perfectly aware of how one might go about planting and harvesting grains and vegetables. They just didn’t see any reason why they should. ‘Why should we plant,’ one !Kung informant put it – in a phrase cited ever since in a thousand treatises on the origins of farming – ‘when there are so many mongongo nuts in the world?’

Instapaper: Tuesday, Nov. 30th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 689-690 | Added on Saturday, 4 December 2021 09:48:48

Horizontal social movements driven by middle-class white leftists tend to define “democracy” by virtue of procedures and decision-making processes. But the economic democracy movement teaches us to attend carefully to who is (and who is not) in the room.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 174 | location 2665-2667 | Added on Sunday, 5 December 2021 19:22:58

All we know for sure is that the lack of an agricultural base does not seem to have stopped those who gathered on Poverty Point from creating something that to us would appear very much like little cities which, at least during certain times of year, hosted a rich and influential intellectual life.

Instapaper: Tuesday, Dec. 7th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 45-46 | Added on Tuesday, 7 December 2021 21:03:35

We are being robbed of the illusion that we can predict what will happen in the space of a second, a minute, an hour or a day. From one moment to the next, the pandemic seems to turn and point its finger at anyone, even at those who believed they were safely immune.

Instapaper: Tuesday, Dec. 7th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 74-77 | Added on Tuesday, 7 December 2021 21:06:21

“There used to be no house,” the Marxist critic Walter Benjamin wrote in his 1936 essay The Storyteller, “hardly a room, in which someone had not once died.” In modern life, on the other hand, he argued, dying had been pushed beyond the perceptual realm of the living, although his diagnosis did not of course include the destitute nations or anticipate the impending war.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 209 | location 3200-3201 | Added on Tuesday, 7 December 2021 22:49:32

on fishing, and particularly the harvesting of anadromous

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 242 | location 3708-3709 | Added on Thursday, 9 December 2021 22:28:34

the process by which cultures define themselves against one another is always, at root, political, since it involves self-conscious arguments about the proper way to live.

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 14 | location 215-217 | Added on Monday, 13 December 2021 21:46:22

Different views are almost always opposed to each other as though they really were different views of the same object. But this kind of account practically forces us to regard one or other of these thinkers, or both of them, as crazy, or at the very least as totally lacking in judgement.

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 15 | location 224-226 | Added on Monday, 13 December 2021 21:47:37

The real trouble is this: giving expression to thought by the observable medium of words is like the work of the silkworm. In being made into silk, the material achieves its value. But in the light of day it stiffens; it becomes something alien, no longer malleable. True, we can then more easily and freely recall the same thought, but perhaps we can never experience it again in its original freshness.

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 16 | location 233-235 | Added on Monday, 13 December 2021 21:49:01

it is precisely the common features of all experience, such as characterise everything we encounter, which are the primary and most profound occasion for astonishment; indeed, one might almost say that it is the fact that anything is experienced and encountered at all.

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 22 | location 334-337 | Added on Wednesday, 15 December 2021 22:47:52

But, as against this, it may perhaps be possible for logical thinking to disclose at least this much: that to grasp the basis of phenomena through logical thought may in all probability be impossible, since logical thought is itself a part of phenomena, and wholly involved in them; and we may ask ourselves whether, in that case, we are obliged to deny ourselves the use of an allegoric picture of the situation, merely on the grounds that its fitness cannot be strictly proved.

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 23 | location 353-357 | Added on Wednesday, 15 December 2021 22:50:10

What is it that has called you so suddenly out of nothingness to enjoy for a brief while a spectacle which remains quite indifferent to you? The conditions for your existence are almost as old as the rocks. For thousands of years men have striven and suffered and begotten and women have brought forth in pain. A hundred years ago, perhaps, another man sat on this spot; like you he gazed with awe and yearning in his heart at the dying light on the glaciers. Like you he was begotten of man and born of woman. He felt pain and brief joy as you do. Was he someone else? Was it not you yourself? What is this Self of yours?

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 25 | location 369-370 | Added on Wednesday, 15 December 2021 22:51:53

Hence this life of yours which you are living is not merely a piece of the entire existence, but is in a certain sense the whole-,

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 25 | location 373-375 | Added on Wednesday, 15 December 2021 22:52:56

Thus you can throw yourself flat on the ground, stretched out upon Mother Earth, with the certain conviction that you are one with her and she with you. You are as firmly established, as invulnerable as she, indeed a thousand times firmer and more invulnerable. As surely as she will engulf you tomorrow, so surely will she bring you forth anew to new striving and suffering.

My view of the world (Schrödinger, Erwin, 1887-1961)

  • Your Highlight on page 25 | location 373-377 | Added on Wednesday, 15 December 2021 22:53:10

Thus you can throw yourself flat on the ground, stretched out upon Mother Earth, with the certain conviction that you are one with her and she with you. You are as firmly established, as invulnerable as she, indeed a thousand times firmer and more invulnerable. As surely as she will engulf you tomorrow, so surely will she bring you forth anew to new striving and suffering. And not merely ‘some day’: now, today, every day she is bringing you forth, not once but thousands upon thousands of times, just as every day she engulfs you a thousand times over. For eternally and always there is only now , one and the same now; the present is the only thing that has no end.

Instapaper: Friday, Dec. 17th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 329-331 | Added on Monday, 20 December 2021 21:11:11

This special sense of hearing is something, perhaps, like the averted, peripheral vision that allows one to glimpse the fainter, more distant stars, for esoteric truths can only be glimpsed, never directly verified.

Instapaper: Friday, Dec. 17th (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 418-422 | Added on Monday, 20 December 2021 21:24:39

The basic ritual, or “protocol”, of sustained attention in universal use among practitioners of the Order of the Third Bird consists of three primary phases, which are called (with small variations) Attending, Negating, and Realizing.2 Rather than the three birds of Morris’ allegory corresponding, as one might expect, to the first, second, and third bird of the aforementioned pseudo-Ausonian parable, it seems they correspond to these three phases, in which practitioners ask in turn, of the Work before them, What Is, What Is Not, and What Shall Be. Attending

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 332 | location 5079-5080 | Added on Monday, 20 December 2021 21:54:38

lives…urbanites live in small social worlds that touch but do not interpenetrate.

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 341 | location 5226-5227 | Added on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 23:30:04

‘we have a bad habit, encouraged by pedants and sophisticates, of considering happiness as something rather stupid.’

The Dawn of Everything (David Graeber;David Wengrow)

  • Your Highlight on page 342 | location 5231-5233 | Added on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 23:30:56

why do we assume that people who have figured out a way for a large population to govern and support itself without temples, palaces and military fortifications – that is, without overt displays of arrogance, self-abasement and cruelty – are somehow less complex than those who have not?

Instapaper: Tuesday, Jun. 1st (Instapaper)

  • Your Highlight at location 736-737 | Added on Thursday, 23 December 2021 23:41:53

“The ultimate, hidden truth of the world is that it is something that we make, and could just as easily make differently.”

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